1850-2010 IEEE Standard for Property Specification Language

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Extra info for 1850-2010 IEEE Standard for Property Specification Language (PSL)

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In contrast to the built-in functions ended(), prev(), stable(), rose(), and fell(), the function next() is not affected by the clock of its context. Restrictions The argument of next() shall be the name of a signal; an expression other than a simple name is not allowed. A call to next() may only be used on the right-hand side of an assignment to a memory element (register or latch). It shall not be used on the right-hand side of an assignment to a combinational signal nor directly in a property, or in a sequence, or as a parameter to a built-in function.

While the linear semantics of PSL are the ones most used in properties, the branching semantics add important expressive power. For instance, branching semantics are sometimes required to reason about deadlocks. 4 Simple subset PSL can express properties that cannot be easily evaluated in simulation, although such properties can be addressed by formal verification methods. In particular, PSL can express properties that involve branching or parallel behavior, which tend to be more difficult to evaluate in simulation, where time advances monotonically along a single path.

3 Linear vs. branching logic PSL can express both properties that use linear semantics as well as those that use branching semantics. The former are properties of the PSL Foundation Language, while the latter belong to the Optional Branching Extension. Properties with linear semantics reason about computation paths in a design and can be checked in simulation, as well as in formal verification. Properties with branching semantics reason about computation trees and can be checked only in formal verification.

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