Byzantium in the Iconoclast Era (C. 680-850): The Sources: by Leslie Brubaker, John F. Haldon

By Leslie Brubaker, John F. Haldon

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Extra resources for Byzantium in the Iconoclast Era (C. 680-850): The Sources: An Annotated Survey (Birmingham Byzantine and Ottoman Monographs 7)

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63 MATERIAL CULTURE 16 v) LITURGICAL PLANNING Changes in the liturgy parallel the architectural changes noted above. Sometime after the sixth century, the tripartite sanctuary was developed, and this became standard by the Middle Byzantine period. The central space of the bema is flanked by pastophoria, the prothesis and diakonikon. These were functional extensions of the bema and connected directly to it. The appearance of the tripartite sanctuary corresponds with the development of the prothesis rite, documented in the eighth century.

Perhaps more importantly, he had the Sea Wall and Golden Horn Wall substantially rebuilt, as the numerous surviving inscriptions testify (fig. 9). , Chronographia, 412; Mango-Scott, 572; Ruggieri, Byzantine Religious Architecture, 142, proposes an epicentre near Gemlik- that is, not far from the centre ofthe 17 August 1999 earthquake. , 142-53) that new building types developed as a response to the earthquake is without merit. 76 Foss and Winfield, Byzantine Fortifications, 53-4. , Chronographia, 440 (trans.

Buchwald, The Church of the Archangels in Sige near Mudania (Vienna 1969). O. Wulff, Die byzantinische Kunst (Potsdam 1924) 453-4; see also E. Kalinka and J. Strzygowski, `Die Cathedrale von Herakleia', JOAI 1, Beiblatt, 3-27; Ruggieri, 33 Byzantine Religious Architecture, 235-6, supports an earlier date. 34 Theocharidou, Architecture ofHagia Sophia; Krautheimer, Early Christian and Byzantine Architecture, 4th edn, still gives an early eighth-century date, 291-5. O. Wulff, Die Koimesiskirche in Nicda and ihre Mosaiken (Strassburg 1903); 35 F.

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